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Debunking Common Myths About Google Panda: Part 2

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Debunking Common Myths About Google Panda: Part 2


With all the myths floating around on the internet about the Google Panda update, it’s time that we made some sense about what that update really means and how webmasters can adjust to it. Here are some more myths about the update that we can debunk:

 

  • Large Sites that Consistently Ranked Well Will Not be Affected

 

There are some major players in the web content field that were hit by the Panda update. About.com, a site that provides information on various topics thanks to guides and FAQ’s submitted by its users has stated that it saw a “moderate” impact on its traffic due to Panda.

 

Associated Content, a site where different writers can submit articles and that was owned by Yahoo! Has also been affected. This has resulted in Yahoo! Retiring the site, opting instead to keep some of its best content and to move it over to a new site called Yahoo Voices.

 

Therefore, no matter how big or popular a site is, it can be affected by Panda.

 

  • Sites That Were Penalized Will Still Keep the Penalty After Improving Their Content

 

Web pages that are in Google’s index are run through the filter on an occasional basis. Pages that were improved will have a chance to get back on track. The important thing to know is that you should seek to make improvements to your entire site to ensure that it has quality content and not just a few pages. It may take a while for your site to recover from its penalty, however Panda is not designed to permanently ban a site from the search index.

 

  • Only the Pages With Poor Content Will be Penalized

 

Unfortunately, Panda will apply a penalty that will be valid for the entire site if there are enough pages that are classified as poor quality. It is possible that some pages on a website that have been penalized will keep their good ranking if they are of very high quality, however. But this is not something that will happen in all cases. Therefore, webmasters need to be sure that all of the pages on their site have high quality content, or risk getting penalized.

 

  • Only Websites That Have Articles on Them Will be Penalized

 

Again, all web pages will go through Panda, so it doesn’t matter what type of content you have on your site. It will still be subjected to the rules of the filter. Even if your website only has pages which have one or two hundred words on them and can’t really be classified as “articles”, your site could face a penalty if these pages are ranked as poor quality. No matter what you have on your website, you should follow the basic SEO recommendations, such as making sure that good spelling and grammar is used on all pages, not overusing keywords, not inserting irrelevant keywords into pages they don’t belong, etc.

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Debunking Common Myths About Google Panda

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Debunking Common Myths About Google Panda


Ever since Google rolled out their “Panda” Update in February 2011, there have been many myths that have circulated all over the web about it. Here are some of the more common ones and answers to them:

 

  • Google Wants to Get Rid of Affiliate Marketing as We Know It

 

The Panda update has nothing to do with affiliate marketing, CPA offers, etc. It can affect any website, whether it is selling its own products, promoting affiliate offers, or even not selling anything at all and not containing any ads. Those who do affiliate marketing or promote cost per action offers properly (using different traffic sources, ensuring the quality of landing pages and web content, etc) should not suffer too much from it. It’s designed to stop marketers who use Black Hat SEO techniques, such as publishing content designed to attract those who search for certain terms and then trying to get them to buy a product.

 

  • The Panda Update Only Affects Content Repositories

 

Every website on Google’s index will go through the Panda filter, no matter what kind of site it is. Whether you have just a few pages that were written by yourself, or you run a site where hundreds of different authors submit content, your site will be filtered through it just the same. While some of the websites that were the most affected by the Panda update were indeed content repositories, the reason behind this is that they had a higher chance of having poor quality content on their sites to begin with, as they have submissions from many different authors.

 

  • Panda Only Targets Queries done in US English

 

This was true at the beginning, but it’s just not the case anymore. Content in all languages, except Chinese, Japanese and Korean will be affected by Panda. Therefore, if the content on your site is written in a language other than English, this will not let you “escape” the new filter created by Google. While it is not known as of now if the same criteria is used to filter sites in all languages, according to some online marketing news, it seems that sites published in other languages can indeed be penalized if they have too much content that is irrelevant, poorly written, or repetitive.

 

  • If a Page has Gone Through the Filter the First Time, Everything is OK

 

Google has made several adjustments and tweaks to Panda which have the goal of making it more effective for its intended purpose. Google is expected to continue rolling out updates to it. Therefore, attempting to “outsmart” Google by using black or gray hat SEO techniques is unlikely to work well in the long term. The only way forward if you want your site to rank well on a consistent basis is to provide your users with quality content at all times.

 

There are a few other myths about Panda that are circulating. Tomorrow we will take a look at some more.

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